S house by Pitsou Kedem Architects

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THE S HOUSE


Location : Herzliya, Israël
Year : 2016

The skyline – the meeting of earth and heaven – is the Archimedean point in every swath of architecture that orients the building in its surrounding. Whether it be built in a dense urban fabric, on a high mountain or a narrow, deep canyon – each building is measured by its sky. Classical architecture that developed within the bosom of the church, aspired toward the sublime, the dimensions were propelled upwards by way of vertical windows and tall columns. In contrast, however, modern architecture, particularly residential constructions, see the skyline as a backdrop of human creativity, a horizontal emphasis on the buildings’ dimensions or even as a mere tool serving human needs.

In both the ancient and modern cases, the skyline is the simplest element required to place the building in a concrete context, even an imagined one. Second to that is the presence of another building and then trees and so on down the list of elements in the environment. Perhaps because of this, the architecture of private homes is the last bastion of the architecture of objects – not required to kowtow to its surroundings – it engages both architecture and sculpture.

Such is the S house located in — . At first glance it is a hovering horizontal prism, emphasized by a double skyline – above and below. A second glance seeks out the meeting of the prism with the ground, attempting to decipher the system of physical balance that allows the composition to float while being anchored, as it were, to a horizontal concrete wall resting on a steel beam hovering above an English garden. The result is a choreographed construction held eternally in a gravity-defying pose.

The levitation of the prism, formed by clean lines, dictates the entirety of the grounds and entrance by way of transparent partitions of different types – dropping down toward and marking the ground. As such, the public spaces of the home – the dining room, kitchen, living room, garden and decorative pool – have their inner and outer boundaries entirely blurred. Similarly, the entrance from the street prepares the visitor for the “space vessel” with the aid of shutter-like walls of wood – forming an outdoor lobby – barely visible from the street and open to the interior of the house. A lobby which is built in proportion to the salon, inchoate as it were, formed by an additional mass of concrete that further amplifies the hovering prism.
The design of the lower floor is separate from the prism above, yet nonetheless balances it through cross sections with a certain constructive functionality. It is indeed a counterweight, a balance sheet or even technical anchor in every sense. It gives shelter to intimacy and privacy, housing the bedrooms and managing the inverted relationship to the environment, thereby establishing that this house is not only a virtuous object but a space around which life is calculated.

Pitsou Kedem Architects


 

 


CONTACT

Pitsou Kedem Architect
39 Maze St. Ground Floor Tel-Aviv
T. 03.6204493 F. 03.6292835

Studio: office@pitsou.com
Pitsou: pitsou@pitsou.com
Press: pitsou.press@pitsou.com


 

Source : http://www.pitsou.com/

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Villa F by Peter Thomas Hornung, Elsa Katharina Jacobi, Jan Escher architects

 

Project: Villa F
Architects : Peter Thomas Hornung, Elsa Katharina Jacobi, Jan Escher
Location: Rhodes, Greece
Year: 2011-undisclosed
Type: residential
Size: 220qm


The site of the holiday home in Rhodes/Greece yet possess characteristics and outstanding qualities, which we only attempted to frame with our design.

The site is located three meters above a coastal road, which is bordered by a natural stonewall that has been equally continued for our proposal. On the one hand the continuation of the found wall generates a high level of privacy, while on the other hand it relates to the given situation, which we were tempted to preserve as much as possible. The holiday home was designed for a couple. They wished a separate area for guests, which we mostly embedded in the given topography by integrating the shady tree population and without generating an equally visible volume.
At first sight the typology of the building seems to be strange compared with the context. However this first impression will be refuted by the choreography of the building, which is precisely orientated at the context. While from a formal point of view the building relates to the found eroded rocks and washed away shoreline, the entrance was generated by an interruption in the continuous natural stonewall, which leads one at first „under“ the site. Skylights show the path up to the main living area. The generated twist focuses our sight towards the ocean, whereas the surrounding walls only serve as a frame of the context. Thus a spatial division of the different uses was avoided where possible, as well as a differentiation of interior- and exterior spaces. Most important was to prevent a limitation of the magnificent view.
The challenge in this design lies in construction and the involved climate technology. The construction of the building above ground is planned as a prefabricated timber structure finished with white plaster,  which generates an abstract link to traditional old buildings close to that site. The lightweight construction was chosen because it will be mainly used for spontaneous short-term visits. Massive building parts were avoided  to reach a quick cool down. Through a mechanically controlled opening in the roof a well-known chimney effect will be activated, which starts at the massive base plate in the garage from where integrated cable ducts lead cooled air.

Peter Thomas Hornung, Elsa Katharina Jacobi, Jan Escher


Source : http://hornungjacobi.com/


HORNUNG AND JACOBI ARCHITECTURE is an Architecture and Research Studio based in Hamburg, Germany. Common ground throughout our projects, irrespective of it´s size or program, is their progressive relationship with the context. Thus we understand the environment, the program and people interacting with our design as part of the context, which leads to innovative, sensitive and unique proposals.
Our projects are drawing attention to the constant change and evolution of our life. We trust in the potential to create an environment, which integrates other disciplines and thus other specialists to disclose unexpected qualities. In line with our corporate philosophy we enjoy testing new ideas, which might initially appear utopian, but never lack pragmatism to actually realize them.
This approach relates to our fascination of big building projects as much as to small-scale projects. Our declared aim is to achieve highest possible quality, excellent detailing and the creation of an integrated strategy involving the individual needs of the user, regardless of the budget. We believe it is through exchange and research of our surroundings that enable us to unfold diverse aspects of our ‘lebensraum’ to come.

HORNUNG AND JACOBI ARCHITECTURE was established in 2012 by PETER THOMAS HORNUNG AND ELSA KATHARINA JACOBI. Both benefit from a high profile education and working experience in internationally well-known offices.


 

M.A. Architect PETER THOMAS HORNUNG
Peter Thomas Hornung studied Architecture at the University of Applied Sciences in Stuttgart / Germany, as well as at the University of Technology in Delft / the Netherlands, where he did his bachelor thesis. For his master thesis in 2007 he recieved a distinction and was nominated for the national Walter-Henn-Förderpreis.
Peter Thomas Hornung has wide experience in internationally renowned architecture offices, including Zaha Hadid Architects (London), Wenzel + Wenzel (Stuttgart / Abu Dhabi) and Harry Seidler & Associates (Sydney). At Zaha Hadid Architects he worked as a professional from 2009 – 2011 for the Learning And Library Centre in Vienna, Austria, which will be completed in 2013.

 

M.A. Architect ELSA KATHARINA JACOBI
Elsa Katharina Jacobi studied Architecture at the University of Applied Sciences in Stuttgart / Germany, as well as in Rhode Island School of Design / USA. In 2006 she has been awarded for her final thesis – the extension of the Asplund Library in Stockholm / Sweden. In 2007 she has been selected for the prestigious scholarship by DAAD to do a MA Design Studio at the renowned Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design in London. Her final thesis “Identialism” has been awarded and exhibited at the Shoreditch Townhall in London, 2008.
Elsa Katharina Jacobi has wide experience in internationally renowned architecture offices, including Zaha Hadid Architects (London), MYAA (London), Wulf&Partner (Stuttgart) and Dale Jones Evans Architecture (Sydney).
In 2010 she has been invited as a Guest Critic to the Architectural Association in London to speak about the phenomenon ‘Heterotopia’ with the students by the Intermediate Unit 13, led by Miraj Ahmed and Martin Jameson.
Since 2012 she is teaching as an Assistant Professor at the ‘Universität der Künste’ in Berlin. This change of perspective keeps the dialogue in our studio fresh, enriches our research and supports our search for unconventional solutions.

HOUSE HAFNER by HORNUNG AND JACOBI ARCHITECTURE

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Project : House Hafner

Collaborators : Peter Thomas Hornung & Elsa Katharina Jacobi

Location : Büschelhof, Germany

Year : 2011/2012

Type : Residential

Size : 180qm

Description by architecte :

The site of “House Hafner” is located in the countryside next to forest in Southem Germany. Situated at the end a blind alley to benefit from the views of the woodsand valley. A very high level of privacy is provided by the natural protection of the environment, which makes an open living configuration possible.

The slight remodeling of the topography with a given height difference of three meters inspired the choreography and orientation of the building.

The residential building is designed for a couple with an independent area for guests and is divided into two parts : one introverted area, articulated by an arrangement of smaller openings following the surrounding typology of the neighborhood; its counterpart is an extroverted zone facing the forest and the beautiful view of the valley.

The exterior space is interpreted as an extension of the open living area.

The abstracted shape of the gabled roof draws an analogy to nthe surrounding roof typologies, which is common in Southem Germany. The transformation to an open cubic design made a maximum size of openings possible, as well as the visual merging of living and nature.

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Studio

HORNUNG AND JACOBI ARCHITECTURE is an Architecture and Research Studio based in Hamburg, Germany. Common ground throughout our projects, irrespective of it´s size or program, is their progressive relationship with the context. Thus we understand the environment, the program and people interacting with our design as part of the context, which leads to innovative, sensitive and unique proposals.
Our projects are drawing attention to the constant change and evolution of our life. We trust in the potential to create an environment, which integrates other disciplines and thus other specialists to disclose unexpected qualities. In line with our corporate philosophy we enjoy testing new ideas, which might initially appear utopian, but never lack pragmatism to actually realize them.
This approach relates to our fascination of big building projects as much as to small-scale projects. Our declared aim is to achieve highest possible quality, excellent detailing and the creation of an integrated strategy involving the individual needs of the user, regardless of the budget. We believe it is through exchange and research of our surroundings that enable us to unfold diverse aspects of our ‘lebensraum’ to come.

HORNUNG AND JACOBI ARCHITECTURE was established in 2012 by PETER THOMAS HORNUNG AND ELSA KATHARINA JACOBI. Both benefit from a high profile education and working experience in internationally well-known offices.

http://hornungjacobi.com/

 

HOUSE IN LA CAÑADA by Ramon Esteve Estudio as Architects

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The house in La Cañada is placed on a residential area very close to Valencia. Its plot is surrounded by existing vegetation and opened to its immediate surroundings. A large number of pine trees and palm trees forms the background of the house.

The origin of the project is the need of selfenclosed house, protected from the exterior but also fluid and opened to the depth of the garden

The square-plan layout is pierced by several perforations with different aims. The first of them hollows out the heart of the house and opens its perimeter. Thus, it becomes a large central courtyard that gives access to the house like a Roman atrium. This courtyard fulfils three different uses: generating an access, organising the rooms and allowing their visual connection. A large sheet of water stands out in this space and makes it look wider by reflecting the internal façade of the house and the sky. Thus, entering the house becomes a changing, pleasant and harmonious promenade.

On the opposite side of the house, a large cantilever of white concrete frames the pool and the garden. This canopy has got two perforations to allow the entrance of sunlight. In the same veranda there are different living zones for summer or winter according to the sun exposure. In order to highlight the horizontal character of the house, there is only a storey above the ground level.

A great welcoming feeling is achieved because the house has got a really human scale. The service rooms are located on the basement storey, which gets light and ventilation through a sunken courtyard on the north façade.

Being the access of the house at its centre, the day rooms and the night rooms are separated in a very natural way. The interior of the house has been designed to be fluid and continuous. The furniture, such as the pass-through fireplace and the low cabinets, allows the visual connections between adjacent rooms. The different wings of the house are also visually connected through the central courtyard. The sensation of fluidity is enhanced by the use of minimalistic window frames that are embedded into the walls. The sliding panes are completely hidden into the walls, thus opening the house outwards and blurring its limits.

The enclosing walls are thick stonemasonry walls that protect the interior. The wide glass panes are protected by wooden slats that can be adjusted or slide into the walls. By this means, the sun exposure and the views from outside can be controlled. The canopy that frames the entrance and protects the veranda is made of white exposed concrete. This massive, texturized and sheltering skin encloses the internal spaces, where the white colour and the polished materials are the main features. The garden can be contemplated from a neutral canvas made of lacquered surfaces, smoked glasses and a pavement of trowelled concrete.

Water is used as another building material. Both the sheet of water in the entrance and the lengthwise pool make the space look wider and cool the environment. Each and every element, from the architecture that gives shape to the building until the smallest detail, follows the same philosophy and uses the same language. Al the furniture in the house has been designed by Ramón Esteve Estudio.

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Source :

inicio

 

GLASS HOUSE Designed by: Nico van der Meulen

Location: Senderwood, Johannesburg, South Africa
Residence size: 2068 m²

Nico-van-der-Meulen-glass-house-12Description by Nico van der Meulen 

Design description:
The owners of this custom designed glass and concrete home have four children, and requested a contemporary mansion making provision for an informal lifestyle on a grand scale.

The brief included a small formal lounge cum tete-a -tete space, a large open plan family room, a dining room for 20 guests, basement parking for 14 cars and a playroom for the children next to the kitchen. The brief  also included a breakfast room, lanai, bar, indoor and outdoor pool, a splash pool for the children, gymnasium, a kitchen with a pantry , walk-in cold rooms, billiards room, home theatre, six suites and a staff cottage.

Nico van der Meulen Architects presented an architectural design in a horseshoe shape around a central water feature.

The frameless glass folding doors start at the dining room and stretch for approximately 70m around the dining room, atrium, family room, lanai, water feature and gym.

The family room is a partially double volume space, flowing seamlessly into the lanai and heated indoor pool.

The staircase floats over a pond that is solar heated in winter, together the indoor pool and heat storage tanks keep the home at a constant 24°C throughout winter.

In the background, a circular raised glass water feature is framed by a two storey high beam which obviates the need for corner columns at the main suite.

Interior:

The interior design by M Square Lifestyle Design was inspired from boutique hotels across the world, as the mansion had to have a glamorous feel.

M Square Lifestyle Necessities supplied furniture that was innovatively kept low so that there was no obstruction.   Amongst the furniture used were B&B Italia, Molteni & C, and Roda.

Visit the website of Nico Van Der Meulen Architects http://www.nicovdmeulen.com/portfolio/glass-house-2/#

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