Interlock House by Matt Fajkus Architecture

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Location: Austin, Texas
Year: 2017



Architects: Matt Fajkus Architecture
Project Manager: Sarah Johnson
Design Team: Sarah Johnson; Matt Fajkus, AIA; David Birt; Ian Ellis; Garland Fielder
Structural Engineering: Smith Structural Engineers
Interior Design: Studio Tupelo
General Contractor: Wall to Wall Construction
Rug: Kyle Bunting
Dining Room Artwork: Ty Clark
Logistics: Nitsche Events
Photography: © Charles Davis Smith



Located on a small triangular lot near Bull Creek in Austin, this house addition was required to comply with complex ordinance regulations which drastically constrain the possibility to add area to an 800 square-foot house originally built in the 1950’s. The house design embraces these constraints, rather than fighting them, to create a truly unique house and experience.

The addition of a new master bedroom suite was to be configured within the acute angle of the triangular lot, while the entry/dining space is simply an expansion of the existing living/entry area on the wider portion of the property. The limits of the triangular lot were further compounded by the setback requirements for a corner lot, which required a 15′ side-yard setback making a single-story addition almost impossible. Budget optimization, however, made a single-story scheme more advantageous, so we petitioned to the city’s Board of Adjustment for a 10′ setback, which was granted. These constraints were influential in the creation of an articulate, yet humble and respectful addition to the original house.

New roof geometry and corollary clerestory windows are key components of the design, allowing natural light to reach the full depth of each space in nuanced ways. The original, simple gable structure was kept intact and articulated as a crisp white box to juxtapose the wood-lined, glass box additions for the master suite and the dining/entry space. Wood windows and tall gable ceilings offset the original interior from the compressed, cypress-lined, glassy spaces of the additions. The articulation of new versus old is further emphasized by the natural light that pierces through the clerestory windows at points of connection. At all times, one is aware of the conceptual principles of the project.

Matt Fajkus Architecture


1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith
1900W 40th Street - Austin Texas USA
© Charles Davis Smith

All images courtesy of Matt Fajkus Architecture


Matt Fajkus Architecture


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Matt Fajkus

A native of Austin, Matt Fajkus holds a Master in Architecture from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, where he completed his thesis work with Pritzker Prize-winning architect Rafael Moneo. Before going independent in 2010 and establishing MF Architecture, Fajkus achieved significant experience in architectural practice. While working for the world-renowned firm Foster + Partners in London for several years, he worked on the design of numerous high-profile, international large-scale projects. Starting at firms in 1998, he also worked on numerous small-scale award-winning projects while with Max Levy Architects in Dallas, Brinkley Sargent Architects, and Julie Snow Architects in Minneapolis. In 2012, Fajkus was awarded two AIA National Emerging Professional Awards.

In addition to leading MF Architecture, Fajkus is a Tenured Associate Professor at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, where he teaches courses in design, technology, daylighting and integrated sustainability. In 2013 he was recognized with the University of Texas System Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award – the highest teaching honor awarded by the entire school system. Additionally in 2013, Fajkus was presented with the Faculty Scholarship Award for Innovative Practice, and the ACSA/AIAS National New Faculty Teaching Award in 2012. He has co-authoring a book titled Architectural Science and the Sun, which is currently under contract with Routledge Publishers.

Fajkus is a LEED Accredited Professional and a licensed architect in the State of Texas. Fajkus was named the winner of the Engineering, Architecture and Design category at the 17th Austin Under 40 Award in 2015, and the winner of AIA Austin’s Emerging Professional Achievement Honor Award in 2017.

matt@mfarchitecture.com 

TEAM MF Architecture


CONTACT

Matt Fajkus Architecture LLC
900 East 6th Street, Suite 100, Austin, Texas 78702
P : 512 . 432 . 5137
E : info@mfarchitecture.com


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Matt Fajkus Architecture


 

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David Street House by Murray Legge Architecture

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Location: Austin,Texas, USA
Size: 2000 sf
Year:  2018



Architects: Murray Legge Architecture
Design Team: Murray Legge, Lincoln Davidson, Travis Avery, Benjamin Kaplowitz, Luca Senise
Builder: Green Places
Engineering: Duffy Engineering
Photography: © Leonid Furmansky



This project began with two families purchasing a large Central Austin property and subdividing it into two narrow lots to build new homes on – we were hired to design one of the homes. The clients, a young creative couple with two small children, wanted a modest house with three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and ample living spaces with strong connections to private outdoor rooms.

The site is in a bustling neighborhood, near a major university, so the house was set on the site to create a private side-yard the family could use as an extension of the main living space. A wall in front of the house creates a private courtyard off of the front rooms and protects them from view. Meanwhile a tectonic screen porch sits in the backyard, in contrast with the solid mass of the house in front.

The house is a mass that is carved – creating deep, shaded, openings that connect to the outside. The entire building is rendered in natural grey stucco, producing a solid sculptural form. Shadows from the surrounding trees play across its surface throughout the day.

The ground floor plan is conceived as a series of open interconnected spaces arranged around a central stair and utility core. The spaces are divided by Douglas Fir cabinetry, with a continuous ceiling. The cabinets divide the space into various uses (kitchen, study, living, and TV room) while maintaining the feeling of a large open room. An internal light-well brings daylight into the center of the house and connects the two floors, creating a surprising vertical opening through the house.

The second floor contains all three bedrooms, connected by a “bridge” that overlooks the kitchen. Each bedroom has direct access to an exterior patio or deck. “Pop ups” on the roof bring in plentiful daylight from above and create compelling space in otherwise small rooms.

Murray Legge Architecture


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All images courtesy of Murray Legge Architecture

 


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Murray Legge Architecture


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Murray Legge | Photo: © Deborah Eve Lewis

Murray Legge is a graduate of the Cooper Union School of Architecture in New York City. His professional achievements include receiving the 2006 AIA Austin Young Architectural Professional Award as well as more than 20 design awards, including two national AIA awards and the Chicago Athenaeum American Architecture Award.  Winner of the prestigious Lyceum Fellowship, he was also twice a finalist in Van Alen Institute competitions, including the Paris Prize. His work has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers, and he has been a lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has also been a visiting critic.

Murray is also a co-founder of Legge Lewis Legge, an interdisciplinary collaborative, based in Austin and New York. With a focus on large-scale installations, public art and landscape design, Legge Lewis Legge has been widely recognized including receiving the 2010 Austin Art in Public Places Community Arts Award. The studio received an honorable mention in the international design competition for the Flight 93 memorial and was a finalist in the Boston Logan Airport 9/11 memorial competition.  Legge Lewis Legge is currently working on a project for Dallas Arboretum.

Learn more about Murray Legge Architecture


CONTACT

1701 Emilie Lane Unit B
Austin, TX 78731

Phone: 512 596 2933


VISIT

Murray Legge Architecture