South Yarra Project by Studio Lancini

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Location: South Yarra, Victoria, Australia

Year: 2018



Interior Design: Studio Lancini

Photography: © Peter Clarke


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All images courtesy of Studio Lancini


Studio Lancini


Erika Lancini Design is an Interior Design Service having 20 years experience in design within the residential, commercial and retail sectors.

For more information, visit the Studio Lancini website


CONTACT

Studio Lancini

129 Gardenvale Road – Gardenvale

Melbourne – Victoria 3185, Australia

 erika@studiolancini.com.au
T 0405-811-807


VISIT

Studio Lancini


 

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Oceaniques Villas by MM++ Architects

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Location: Mui Ne, Phan Thiet, Vietnam
Built Area: 1014 sqm
Year: 2014



Architects: MM++ Architects
Project Architect: My An Pham Thi
Photography: © Hiroyuki OKI


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My An Pham Thi, Architect

Graduated from University of Hanoi. After more than 10 years of practice in different international architecture offices she founded Mimya co. ( MM++ architects ) in Ho Chi Minh City in 2009.

Michael Charruault, Architect

Graduated from the french architecture school Paris-Belleville. Based in Vietnam ( Saigon ) since 2007, co-founder of Mimya co. ( MM++ architects )


MM++ ARCHITECTS – MIMYA

02-V10, street 6, Phuoc Kien A, Nha Be District, HCMC

TEL (+84)2838226248

FAX (+84)2838226248

MOB (+84)368358803

mimya@mmarchitects.net


VISIT

MM++ Architects


Gjøvik House by Norm Architects

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Location: Gjøvik, Norway

Architects: Norm Architects

Lead Architect: Linda Korndal
Architect: Mette Degn



An hour north of Oslo, located on a majestic hill side facing the Norwegian woods and Mjøsa lake, lies the Gjøvik house; a modern and minimal cluster house created by Norm Architects. The Gjøvik house, consisting of overlapping cubes of different sizes, makes for an intimate and dynamic family home with materials, levels and inbuilt, tailor-made furniture creating a minimal yet warm and secluded feeling. The house gracefully embraces the hill side terrain, merging with its surroundings in a humble and natural manner. Having thoroughly considered the climate in the process of designing the house, the idea behind the cluster style house was to give the home a cosy and inviting feel, where you can truly hibernate while taking shelter from the frigid days of Nordic winter.

“The modern cluster house gives you the sensation of being together, when not necessarily being in the same room, with thresholds defined by switching levels and materials.”

Norm Architects


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All images courtesy of Norm Architects

 


Norm Architects


CONTACT

Snaregade 14
1205 Copenhagen
Denmark

info@normcph.com
+45 28 87 93 09


VISIT

Norm Architects


Three Piece House by TRIAS

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Location: Stockton, New South Wales, Australia
Area: 137 m2
Year: 2018



Awards

2018 AIA NSW ARCHITECTURE AWARD HOUSES (NEW)

2018 AIA NEWCASTLE AWARD FOR SUSTAINABILITY



Architects: TRIAS

Artworks: Mazie Turner, Jordy Hewitt
Selected furniture: Seeho Su, Armadillo & Co, Muji

Photography: © Benjamin Hosking



Three Piece House is a courtyard house, designed for a couple looking to downsize and live more simply. The project places a modest, single-storey house and a studio on its site. These buildings are skewed to follow the site’s boundaries, and cluster to create privacy on this exposed corner lot. The project proposes a new neighbourhood condition that is small and dense, with two discrete dwellings on a conventional suburban site.

The site is defined by a distinctive wedge shape, with close neighbours on two sides. A further challenge came in the form of a flood control, which required the building to be raised 1.5m above ground. In contrast to a conventional architectural response – which might lift the house up on stilts – Three Piece House is placed on a solid brick base. This elevates the building above the flood plain and lends it an unexpected feeling of heft and permanence. The resulting place feels anchored, despite being battered by coastal weather.

This design approach was inspired by Jørn Utzon’s text, ‘Platforms and Plateaus,’ and the architect’s courtyard houses. Three Piece House appropriates this strategy for an Australian setting, using brick platforms to mediate between house and ground.

Three Piece House uses the full extent of its site, encouraging life to take place within, between and beyond the building. Courtyards and gardens ramble between the pavilions, which are unified by their brick base. The scale of this platform is further broken down by brick steps, seating edges and planter beds, which will soon be lush with native plants.

Moving inside, the architectural arrangement is simple yet dynamic. The main house is composed of two pavilions – one for living, and one for sleeping. A reading corridor, which bridges between, faces out to the garden and, in winter, is bathed in northern sun. The brick paving continues through this space, unifying inside and out.

The studio, meanwhile, sits as a discrete, and yet related, volume in the garden. It provides accommodation for visiting friends, family and guests. Throughout Three Piece House, the rooms maintain a compact footprint that is balanced by generous ceilings and carefully cropped openings. Walking around the house, the spaces reveal themselves slowly, via constantly shifting views and vignettes.

The two main courtyards have distinctive characters: one is extroverted and public, the other introverted and private. The southern porch, which faces the river, is a space for neighbourly chats and watching street life go by. The northern courtyard, meanwhile, is a sheltered space for retreat and family gatherings. It is shaded overhead by deciduous vines, providing a simple and time-honoured approach to passive heating and cooling.

The materiality of Three Piece House is robust and resilient, as befits a windswept, coastal site. The textures and tones of the house are raw and rugged, and have been deliberately chosen to become more beautiful as they age. The skillion forms are clad in a radially-sawn Silvertop Ash, which will grey over time. This resource-conscious product uses felled timber as efficiently as possible, minimising wastage and celebrating the timber’s rough grain.

The solid masonry base, meanwhile, is rendered in earthen-red tones that are colour-matched to the recycled brick paving and the rusted reds of passing ships. The bricks reappear throughout the interior, emerging as an anchored island bench and  a fireplace hearth.

The platform is built from recycled bricks that were sourced on-site. These were repurposed from the old house, a dilapidated 1940’s bungalow that we dismantled with our client. This approach is both inherently sustainable, and an act of storytelling: the new home sits upon the bones of the building before it. Philosophically, the gesture speaks of use and re-use; poetry and memory.

Elsewhere, the house pursues principles of sustainability. It employs cross and stack ventilation, thermal mass, water collection, and eroded eaves, which provide shade. The house can be tweaked and adjusted to suit the prevailing season and weather. In summer, the house is cooled by ocean breezes, and the courtyard will be covered by deciduous vines. In winter, a fireplace warms the living pavilion, while the brick corridor soaks up sun. The home also implements solar panels and battery storage, which supply the home with most of its energy needs.

The interior spaces are large, open volumes that maintain a human scale. Corner openings peel back to reveal greenery and views, while high windows exhale air and offer slivers of sun and sky. These openings allow light to creep across walls and floors in animated paths – a daily testament to time passing. Elsewhere, the house embraces the prosaic beauty of its suburb, framing views of the river and neighbouring streets.

Across this project, the budget is spent thoughtfully, focusing on details that improve the client’s daily life: a series of pendant lights suspended in corners, touches of brass for tactility, and a tiled bench for washing in old age. This house is defined by a spirit of ‘less but better,’ with every decision a careful negotiation of longevity and value.

With the house comprising 114m2 – and the studio measuring 22m2 – this is a project that prioritises simplicity and necessity. It questions what constitutes ‘enough’ when we build houses and make homes. Three Piece House is a dynamic and distinctive piece of architecture, that is at once crafted and unpretentious.It is a testament to small living in suburbia.

TRIAS


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TRIAS


TRIAS is an emerging architecture studio based in Sydney, Australia. Since its establishment in 2016, TRIAS has quickly developed a reputation for thoughtful and thorough design work.

The studio is founded on three principles: to create buildings that are solid, simple and beautiful. These ideals tie our work to the origins of architecture, which Vitruvius defined as firmness, commodity and delight.

TRIAS is currently completing projects across Australia, and has received recognition in numerous local and international competitions.


CONTACT

34 Kings Lane Darlinghurst. NSW 2010


VISIT

TRIAS


 

Interior Design Pacific Bondi Beach by Koichi Takada Architects

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Location: Bondi Beach, Sydney, Australia

Clients: Rebel Property Group and Captil. el Group

Year: 2016



AWARD

Winner Development Excellence Awards Development of the Year 2016


Interior Design:  Koichi Takada Architects

Architecture: Andrew Andersons of PTW Architects

Photography: © Sharrin Rees



The more we looked at the space, the more we knew we had to put the focus on that amazing backdrop of Bondi Beach. Gazing out to the ocean from Pacific’s enormous terraces is so dramatic, it blows your mind.

For us, context is very important. We wanted to draw that natural inspiration inside, juxtaposing the energy and texture of the beach environment – the breeze, the air, the smell of the sea salt – with the refinement and luxury embodied within these oceanfront homes. We sought to capture that natural luxury and represent it in physical form.

Living here is a beautiful experience. Everything you touch within the space is beautiful. The mood is soft, calming and always easy on the eye.

Koichi Takada


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All images courtesy of Koichi Takada Architects


Koichi Takada Architects


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Koichi Takada Principal

Koichi Takada has brought a Japanese sensibility to Australian architecture. His work is innovative and refined. Koichi melds the traditions of his homeland with today’s stunning flowing forms – an approach he developed in New York, London and Tokyo.

Koichi Takada has won international competitions in Australia and Japan as well as several key architectural and interior design awards. The firm’s projects are well recognized and have been extensively featured in Australian and international design magazines.

Koichi Takada studied and graduated from the School of Architecture at the City University of New York and the Architectural Association, London. Koichi studied his thesis work under Alejandro Zaera-Polo and Farshid Moussavi with Rem Koolhaas as a visiting critic.

While practicing at Atsushi Kitagawara Architects in Tokyo, Koichi worked on an invited competition of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney in 1997 and stayed in Sydney thereafter. Koichi has been associate director at PTW and worked on award winning luxury apartments in Sydney, and a diverse range of architectural projects in Japan, China, and the Middle-East.

Koichi established his own practice, Koichi Takada Architects in Sydney in 2008. The practice is now growing with competition winning architectural projects and a focus on the construction phase, with key multi-residential projects in Australia and key landmark projects overseas.

Read more here


CONTACT

Koichi Takada Architects

Suite 41 & 42, Level 4
61 Marlborough Street
Surry Hills NSW 2010
Australia

T +61 2 9698 8510
F +61 2 9012 0359
info@koichitakada.com


VISIT

Koichi Takada Architects


 

Springhill House by Lovell Burton Architecture

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Location: Spring Hill, Victoria, Australia
Area: 120 Sqm
Year: 2017


Award

2018 Houses Awards: New House under 200m2



Architects: Lovell Burton Architecture
Project Team: Joseph Lovell, Stephanie Burton
Photography: © Benjamin Hosking
Builder: Nick Andrews
Structural Engineer: Meyer Consulting
Selected furniture from Great Dane, Cult, KFive & Andelucci



Springhill House is a private dwelling designed for an author and artistic director seeking a tree-change from living in the inner suburbs of Melbourne.

The dwelling is part of a larger project of re-imagining and revitalizing an under worked paddock into a place of habitation, connection and reflection. The project explores place-making within a vast rural setting and supports the notion that a dwelling has emotional foundations and memory intrinsic to its physical built form.

The site is defined by triangular boundaries formed by natural desire lines of the county roads. The land that flows across the site has been sculpted into soft undulations from surface water that flows through the ground from the nearby Springhill. There are two dams and a spring at the low point.

The dwelling is sited towards the high point of the site adjacent an outcrop of granite that forms an subtle rise to the north of the building, offering both a foreground for aspect from the dwelling and shelters the home from the noise of the road to west.

The building form takes its cues from archetypal hay sheds that litter the broader Australian landscape. These stoic silhouettes, roofed yet open on all sides, are borne through farming conventions and rational necessity. They are often a reminder of ideas of frontier and shelter that are present within the Australian psyche. For the client, this approach conjured memories of her childhood home on the plains of Western Queensland.

Much like a hay shed, the dwelling’s roof extends beyond the enclosed forms creating sheltered, flexible spaces around most of the building’s perimeter. Supported by a series of glulam portal frames, the roof defines the areas of habitation from the treeless, grassy expanse beyond.

The materials of Springhill House have been selected for their robust and utilitarian qualities. Large galvanized metal sheets are fixed to the outer layer of the building and provide the main source of weather protection. The external material is comfortable within this rural environment and in keeping with its vernacular purpose, it is left unadorned celebrating the inherent qualities of the steel. Subdued reflections of the sky and paddock ripple across the skin of the building, softening the otherwise hard material.

Internally, typical circulation is removed from the plan and spaces overlap to form dual purposes. The living space is organised to the north and west overlooking the outcrop of granite and harnesses the warmth of winter sun. This communal area can remain open and flexible or be curtained off to create a quiet sitting room or spare bedroom.

The main bedroom is orientated the east of the dwelling to capture rising sun and expansive view. The kitchen, bathroom and laundry services are clustered in the centre of the plan and form the main delineation between the work spaces and living spaces. Two working spaces are arranged behind the living spaces, making use of diffuse southern light.

At Springhill House, capturing views was important to the client. Three large windows are arranged around the dwelling to capture the diverse qualities and facets of the paddock beyond. View and ventilation are separated. Solid ventilation panels are organised throughout the dwelling to enable cross flow ventilation that can be controlled from space to space, leaving view and aspect clear of obstruction.

The home enlists a pared-down material palette of burnished concrete floors, birch ply joinery, porcelain tiles and stainless steel fittings. Blackbutt decking that encircles the dwelling’s verandah also carries through into the bathroom, converging internal and external elements. Internal detailing and joinery are simple and minimal yet highly resolved. The understated design provides the opportunity for occupants to imbue the space with their own histories and experiences.

Throughout this project, each detail of the design is approached with consideration of longevity, value and beauty. No element of the building extends beyond its purpose. Standard sheet sizes of the internal plywood and external steel define the proportions of the spaces. The timber structure is both necessary and provides a rhythmic layer to the facade. Custom steel adorns internal work benches to provide a flash of colour as well as a durable surface. These elements and proportions come together to impart the dwelling with an understanding of human scale.

The entry to Springhill house is nestled between two grass mounds to the south of the dwelling. The entry door is seamlessly detailed to merge with the metal cladding with only the handle, light and path to signify entry. It is fully exposed to the elements and provides a definitive threshold between inside and outside. This conscious decision highlights the sense of exposure of the paddock in contrast with the warmth of the dwelling within.

Lovell Burton Architecture


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All images courtesy of Lovell Burton Architecture | © Benjamin Hosking


PLANS




Lovell Burton Architecture



Lovellburton was founded by Joseph Lovell and Stephanie Burton following a long focused conversation over many years, sharing a common endeavour to shape built environments with a social, environmental and fiscal approach.


CONTACT

Lovell Burton Architecture
43 Derby St, Collingwood, Vic 3066 Australia
admin@lovellburton.com

STEPHANIE BURTON
PRINCIPAL

+61 409 363 611
stephanie@lovellburton.com

JOSEPH LOVELL
PRINCIPAL

+61 411 241 968
joseph@lovellburton.com


VISIT

Lovell Burton Architecture


K Sint-Eloois-Winkel by Frederic Kielemoes

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Location: Kortrijk, Belgium

Year: 2016



Interior Design: Frederic Kielemoes Interior Architect

Photography: © cafeine


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All images courtesy of Frederic Kielemoes | © cafeine

 


Frederic Kielemoes Interior Architect


CONTACT

Izegemsestraat 58A
8880 Sint-Eloois-Winkel
M +32 (0) 486 40 75 64

info@frederickielemoes.be


VISIT

Frederic Kielemoes Interior Architect


Casa OF by Studio Otto Felix

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Location: Sousas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
Built Area: 420 m²
Total Area: 1290 m²
Year: 2016



Architect: Studio Otto Felix

Designer: Otto Felix
Co-Designer: Philip Alder
Interior Design: Tici Andriani e Vic Calil
Landscape Designer: Danil Nunes
Pool: Genesis Ecossistemas
Lighting: Otto Felix and vertz
Photography: © Denilson Machado – MCA Estudio


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Studio Otto Felix


Born February 1980, Otto Felix is regarded a reflection of the decade famous as the information age. He started as a DJ at age 13 and at age 18 he was already trained in Los Angeles as a helicopter pilot besides being a visual artist, photographer, stage designer, music producer and event producer.

In 2004 he graduated in Architecture and Urbanism from the University Paulista (UNIP), and has an MBA in marketing from the Getulio Vargas Foundation and specialized in entrepreneurship at Babson college in Boston. During his college years he discovered his taste and talent for marketing, specializing in commercial projects, corporate and retail, which require the study of market positioning.

In 2005 Otto opened the Studio Felix, who besides architecture, work with audio and design as well. Today Otto Felix focuses on exclusive projects regardless of size.


CONTACT

Studio Otto Felix

Rua Doutor Heitor Penteado, 1029
Joaquim Egídio Campinas SP
CEP 13.108.002
Brazil

+55 19 3298.6678

contato@ottofelix.com.br


VISIT

Studio Otto Felix


Slipway House by Arent & Pyke

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Location: Middle Cove, New South Wales, Australia

Interior design: Arent&Pyke

Photography: © Felix Forest



Set on a cliff overlooking Middle Cove, the home, featuring the signature boat like curves of Walter Barda’s architecture, presides on the steep slope as a series of layers, each boasting magnificent harbour views. Charged with the decoration of the home’s minimal and highly contemporary interiors and outdoor spaces, we celebrated the honesty of its materials and echoed the tones of eucalypts and stone prevalent in the surrounding bushland.

The large dining table echoes both the bushland setting and timber-lined interior, while the sculptural Lindsey Adelman ‘Branches’ pendant over the dining table softens the rigorous architecture and adds a poetic element. Softening and containing the primary lounge is a large indigo hand-knotted rug, which is further softened by the pale grey sofa. Colours of the bush are again interwoven with soft furnishings in warm browns and taupe. Bedrooms have been lightly touched with soft diaphanous drapes offsetting the site poured concrete. Wall tones and carpet are worked within the concrete hues as textural variations of materiality.

Immersed in the landscaping, outdoor areas required easy adaption between private use and entertaining. Again the colours reference bush and stone, and water and sky dominant in the view is supported rather than challenged.

Arent & Pyke

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All images courtesy of Arent&Pyke  | © Felix Forest

 


Arent&Pyke interior design studio


SARAH-JANE PYKEP RINCIPAL
SARAH-JANE PYKE 

SARAH-JANE PYKE PRINCIPAL

Drawing on a Bachelor of Interior Architecture (UNSW), Sarah-Jane’s meticulous attention to detail, coupled with an eye for beautiful and unexpected combinations, has been finely honed through her work with respected architectural firms. Her design processes and spatial acumen, while concept driven, are also highly practical thanks to the invaluable experience of working on-site alongside builders and tradespeople. The result is a genuine and respectful relationship with consultants that is both indicative and cherished as innate to the Arent&Pyke ethos ofcollaborative respect.

 


JULIETTE ARENT PRINCIPAL
JULIETTE ARENT 

JULIETTE ARENT PRINCIPAL

Combining the expertise of a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Sculpture) UNSW with an Advanced Diploma in Interior Design (SIT), Juliette’s is a very particular skill set that is able to facilitate and nurture individual and layered interiors. Her’s is a philosophy of ‘emotional design’ that supports an honest connection with the client, whereby a shared vision is appropriately manifest as a beautiful and liveable result. Indeed, it is the philosophical stance of mid-century designers that most succinctly defines her design principle, in that design, must always respond to the way in which we live and how we interact with 268 Devonshire Street
Surry Hills NSW 2010one another.

more


CONTACT

Studio Arent&Pyke

268 Devonshire Street
Surry Hills NSW 2010

+61 2 9331 2802

 


VISIT

Studio Arent&Pyke

Barwon Heads House by Lovell Burton Architecture

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Location: Barwon Heads, Victoria, Australia
Area: 300 Sqm
Year: 2017



Architects: Lovell Burton Architecture
Photography: © Rory Gardiner
Builder: Project Group
Structural Engineer: Meyer Consulting
ESD Consultant: Ark Resources
Planting: Sophie Maclean
Selected furniture from Luke Furniture



Nestled within swaths of Moonah and tea tree is a new home for a professional couple seeking a seaside retreat in the coastal town of Barwon Heads. The house replaces a former dilapidated cedar cabin and serves as the couple’s primary residence and a holiday home for their three grown children who frequently visit.

The form, orientation and materials of the dwelling respond to the extreme coastal conditions that define the site. Located within close proximity to Bass Strait and the mouth of the Barwon River, the building staggers diagonally across the site providing protection from prevailing south-west weather patterns. Dark grey corrugated iron encases the building and provides a backdrop to verdant Moonah, Boobialla and dune scrub. The robust material echos an Australian vernacular and reflects the workman-like quality of the exterior.

Upon entry, the austere external treatment gives way to the warmth and tactility of timber. Light stained timber is used on floors and ceilings to accentuate the horizontal quality of the site; whereas dark stain is applied to vertical surfaces to provide depth and comparison to the external view. In contrast with timber elements, light grey satin render has been applied to blockwork walls to allow light to bounce deeper into the space. These walls run north to south stabilising the internal environment while also dividing the floor plate into thirds.

Apertures have been carefully considered and seek to capture views and frame moments. The outlook towards the sand dunes to south and south-west is afforded by windows that are either puncture or are carved out of the peripheral skin.

The home is spatially organised with living spaces to the north and services to the south. The ground floor accommodates the bedrooms for the couple’s children as well as a generous bathroom and rumpus area. Upstairs unfolds as a celebration of communal spaces with the kitchen, dining and living areas. Adjacent is the master bedroom which enjoys a wonderful aspect of water, trees and sky.

Highly adaptable, the home has been designed to seamlessly open, close, expand and contract to meet the fluctuating needs of the family. Experiences of home and space therefore feel intimate and cosy as well as exuberant and expansive.

Joinery is integrated subtly throughout the home and marries seamlessly with timber wall panelling. A study is tucked in next to a large built-in bookcase in the living space and can be opened up or concealed with sliding doors that align perfectly with the wall above. Stone and porcelain punctuate the uniform timber joinery with limestone benchtops in the kitchen, vanities in the bathrooms as well as a long low-height bench in the living space.

To the north, the cladding peels away to expose panoramic views of the abundant protected landscaping beyond. The northern aspect also draws warmth from the sun and allows light to flood into the living spaces. Cross flow ventilation is achieved with the integration of solid ventilation panels that can be controlled within each space ensuring views remain clear and unobstructed.

New landscape works restore indigenous vegetation and help blend the edge of the building with the broader site vegetation. The ground has been sculpted in undulating forms to reflect pre-existing conditions and a new raised pool extends out from the dwelling into the tea tree and Moonah.

Lovell Burton Architecture


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All images courtesy of  Lovell Burton Architecture| © Rory Gardiner


PLANS



 


Lovell Burton Architecture



Lovellburton was founded by Joseph Lovell and Stephanie Burton following a long focused conversation over many years, sharing a common endeavour to shape built environments with a social, environmental and fiscal approach.


CONTACT

Lovell Burton Architecture
43 Derby St, Collingwood, Vic 3066 Australia
admin@lovellburton.com

STEPHANIE BURTON
PRINCIPAL

+61 409 363 611
stephanie@lovellburton.com

JOSEPH LOVELL
PRINCIPAL

+61 411 241 968
joseph@lovellburton.com


VISIT

Lovell Burton Architecture


Bellevue Hill House IV by Popov Bass Architects

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Location: Bellevue Hill, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Built area: 500 m²

Year: 2017



Architects: Popov Bass Architects
Project Team: Farnam Ghazizadeh, Brian Bass, Paul Brace, Allison Hair, Anthony Zonaga, Alex Popov
Landscape: Myles Baldwin Design

Photography © Michael Nicholson



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All images courtesy of Popov Bass Architects | © Michael Nicholson

 


Popov Bass Architects


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Brian Bass, Alex Popov and Natalija Sarar

Brian Bass


Director
Nominated Architect

Brian Bass joined the company in 1996. He has extensive experience in medium and high density apartment and mixed use projects in Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia. He has also applied his skills to designing commercial projects including restaurants, tourism facilities, offices and education buildings.


Alex Popov


Director
Nominated Architect

Alex Popov graduated from the Royal Academy, Denmark in 1971 and worked for Henning Larsen and Jorn Utzon before returning to Australia and establishing Alex Popov Architects Pty Ltd in 1983.  Since then, he has applied his design skills to many and varied projects. Alex has established the firm’s highly regarded reputation. The consistently high quality and success of his completed projects has been recognised by numerous awards.


Natalija Sarar


Director

A qualified accountant with extensive marketing experience, Natalija Sarar applies her highly refined eye to all business aspects of our dynamic practice. A people person, her mission is to create a seamless interface between PopovBass and its clients.


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CONTACT

PopovBass
Level 3, 2 Glen Street
Milsons Point NSW 2061
Australia

info@popovbass.com.au
+61 2 9955 5604


VISIT

Popov Bass Architects


Kirribilli Apartment by Brcar Morony Architecture

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Location: Kirribilli, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Year: 2015


Architects: Brcar Morony Architecture

Photography © Justin Alexander


 


The project involved the transformation of a 1960s two bedroom apartment which was lacking natural daylight into an elegant and light filled space with refined, timeless finishes.

The apartment was designed to be flexible for a sole executive owner with generous living and entertaining spaces easily able to be converted into secondary sleeping quarters for staying guests when necessary.

A flexible plan was created and overlaid with a minimalist and monochromatic aesthetic. Generous and finely crafted storage joinery is subtly integrated into each room to provide a series of spaces that appear and feel far more generous then they actually are.

The removal of existing non load bearing walls, the use of clever joinery, sliding panels that can be hidden allow the spaces to connect more seamlessly with one another and also connect visually to its immediate context, views to the Sydney Harbour Bridge, Sydney Harbour and city CBD views.

Brcar Morony Architecture


‘Natalie has great design and management skills. She understood and addressed my needs and project brief entirely.  She delivered an outstanding fit out to my apartment which was on time and on budget. I am delighted to recommend her to you.’

Client Therese Adami


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Images courtesy of Brcar Morony Architecture| © Justin Alexander

Brcar Morony Architecture


Natalie Brcar and Michael Morony cofounded Brcar Morony Architecture in 2015.

Natalie and Michael first met in 1999 at the University of Technology Sydney where they commenced the first of their two degrees in Architecture. Throughout their six years of university studies they had the opportunity to work together on numerous occasions. This joint study, shared interests and mutually agreeable beliefs and thoughts on design was the beginning of a collaborative partnership.

Natalie and Michael both graduated with 1st class honours in 2005 and 2004 respectively while concurrently working in some of the leading architectural practices in Sydney.  Post-graduation, Natalie and Michael continued to work for award winning architectural and development practices in Sydney and progressed to leadership positions within these offices. When opportunities arose Natalie and Michael would undertake private commissions to test their own design philosophies and this experience lead to the formation of Brcar Morony Architecture. more


CONTACT

Brcar Morony Architecture Pty Ltd
ABN 80 140 916 208

Dulwich Hill NSW Australia

NSW Architects Act
M Morony Architect No. 8218

 

Natalie Brcar
Director

M: +61 (0)405 321 884
Natalie@brcarmorony.com

Michael Morony
Director

M: +61 (0)409 272 459
Michael@brcarmorony.com


VISIT

Cape Villa by ARRCC

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Location: South Africa
Year: 2016

Architecture, Design d’intérieur, Photographie: ARRCC



Overlooking the Atlantic Seaboard in Camps Bay, Cape Villa is set against the impressive backdrop of the picturesque Twelve Apostles mountain range and boasts the perfect balance between luxury and comfort. This glamorous home was completely transformed by ARRCC for an international family who enjoy spending time in Cape Town.
Being familiar with ARRCC’s design style, the client brief was to execute ARRCC’s signature style in a new and exciting way to create a modern coastal home with an ethnic edge. Keeping the family’s two children in mind, ARRCC strived to create a space that was contemporary and sophisticated, yet playful and fun. The existing structure was transformed into a large open space accommodating an inflow of natural light through the use of an array of reflective surfaces and large external aluminium screens
which layer the exterior of the house.
The entrance glass lobby is clad in reflective glass which accentuates the magnificent Twelve Apostles mountain views, while a garden oasis borders the walkway to the front door. The entrance level comprises a kitchen, dining and lounge area as well as a designated study and guest washroom.
Dominating the living room is a slattered screen, boldly shaped with an organic design, generating movement and flow within the space. The Volakas marble floors offer a sophisticated design detail and set the colour palette of the space which is accented by French oak veneers with touches of bronze and metallics which add another layer to the interior design.
The entrance makes way for the living area which features a modern design aesthetic, incorporating OKHA furniture – a South African brand of bespoke design – using medium tones that add richness and personality to the space. Artwork by local greats Lionel Smit and Nelson Makamo add a contemporary African feel to the spaces. The living area opens up to the pool entertainment terrace with a covered lounge area, outside shower and infinity pool which leads the eye to views of the ocean. The kitchen, adjacent to the lounge and living space, accentuates the light, organic palette of the villa through its monochromatic and minimalistic design. This leads onto an outdoor space set with a BBQ to accommodate outdoor dining. Also on the entrance level off the lobby, a walkway leads to a selfcontained, private guest suite. The guest suite features a contrasting colour palette to the main house, with dark wood furniture and a textured rug in olive green and mustard which compliments the artwork, by Emalie Bingham, above the bed. The entire house operates on an automated system from which the owner can control the lighting, heating, curtains and audio system.
The lower level accommodates a kid’s playroom dressed with graphic wallpaper and a light colour scheme to create a fun and playful space. Double doors open to a vertical garden with a swing creating a feel of indoor-outdoor living.

On the upper level, a glass bridge links two wings featuring the master bedroom and the two children’s bedrooms. The master bedroom offers an en-suite bathroom and designated dressing room and opens up to a private exterior terrace with uninterrupted views from Lion’s Head to Llandudno.
An authentic Peruvian Alpaca rug adds softness and texture to the space with the wall art above the bed bringing in an element of colour and personality to the room.
With custom designed beds and graphic designed wallpaper, the children’s bedrooms are mirrored versions of each other with differing unique features to reflect a space that is lively and fun with strong African references.
Art was widely used throughout the house to bring personality and emotion to the space. Nina Sierra Rubia, interior designer at ARRCC, talks about her inspiration and use of art pieces within the villa: “We saw the curation of the client’s art collection as an opportunity to showcase a mix of both established and up-and-coming South African artists. We incorporated some serious pieces such as the bust from Lionel Smit and a piece by Nelson Makamo, as well as a tongue-in-cheek installation art piece from Frank Van Reenen. In this project, our biggest considerations were what worked with the scheme, the right format and most importantly, what suited the personalities of our clients,” says Nina.
“While the internal spaces of the home are kept simple, signature ARRCC design elements and bespoke pieces create a modern and sophisticated presence while ensuring that the space reflects the personality of the home owner. We used bold textures and fabrics to add richness to the space with the combination of glamourous and organic materials ensuring that this holiday retreat is the perfect balance between luxury and comfort,” says Jon Case, ARRCC director.

ARRCC


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ARRCC