Whitehall Road Residence | B.E Architecture

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Location: Flinders, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Size: 740 ft2

Year: 2014



Architects: B.E Architecture
Photography: © Peter Clarke



Located in Flinders on the Mornington Peninsula, Whitehall Road is one of B.E Architecture’s established projects that has recently been revisited to capture current imagery.

The house at Whitehall Road is positioned at the crest of a hill, to take advantage of the sweeping views of the surrounding landscape. A grove of mature gum trees inform the location of the house; their tall and slender trunks countering the low horizontality of the building and providing shade to the pool and deck areas. The overriding gesture of the building is the massive drystone wall running the full length of the house. It is cut into the earth, at once anchoring the house and countering the exposure of the site.

Orientated to follow the drystone wall, the house is a series of rectilinear pavilions. Downplaying the scale of the five bedroom house, the pavilions allow for a variety of outdoor, indoor and interstitial spaces. The character of the interstitial spaces is further emphasised through the use of fully retractable glazing and delicate cane screening.

Stone, timber, glass and render are the predominant materials. The heaviness and solidity of the stone and the scale of the timber sections provide a strong contrast to the large expanses of glass which feature throughout. Sightlines are carefully coordinated with the glazing in a sequenced revealing of the vast landscape.

B.E Architecture


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All images courtesy of B.E Architecture

 


B.E Architecture


Led by directors Broderick Ely, Jonathon Boucher And Andrew Piva, the B.E architecture team is young, dynamic and multicultural, with a range of personal interests and specialities.

Members of the firm work closely with their clients, builders and individual contractors to ensure that the building expresses the client it was built for and everything needed is in its place. The designs are quiet, yet strong creating a response that is appropriate to its surroundings with attention to materiality that ensures projects will continue to improve over the passage of time.

With more than 20 years of practice, B.E architecture has built a body of work in various locations around Australia, with international commissions currently under development.

more


CONTACT

B.E Architecture

16 Cecil Place
Prahran VIC 3181
Australia

+613 9529 6433

office@bearchitecture.com


VISIT

B.E Architecture


 

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Oceaniques Villas by MM++ Architects

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Location: Mui Ne, Phan Thiet, Vietnam
Built Area: 1014 sqm
Year: 2014



Architects: MM++ Architects
Project Architect: My An Pham Thi
Photography: © Hiroyuki OKI


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My An Pham Thi, Architect

Graduated from University of Hanoi. After more than 10 years of practice in different international architecture offices she founded Mimya co. ( MM++ architects ) in Ho Chi Minh City in 2009.

Michael Charruault, Architect

Graduated from the french architecture school Paris-Belleville. Based in Vietnam ( Saigon ) since 2007, co-founder of Mimya co. ( MM++ architects )


MM++ ARCHITECTS – MIMYA

02-V10, street 6, Phuoc Kien A, Nha Be District, HCMC

TEL (+84)2838226248

FAX (+84)2838226248

MOB (+84)368358803

mimya@mmarchitects.net


VISIT

MM++ Architects


Artist Retreat by GLUCK+

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Location: Upstate New York, USA

Area: 6,080 sq. feet
Year: 2014



AWARDS

2016 Residential Architect Design Award from Architect magazine, and a 2017 American Architecture Award from The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design and The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies


Architects: GLUCK+
Photography: © Paul Warchol



Located in a land conservancy, a collection of wood-clad cubes orient toward a pond at the bottom of a sloped site. These eight forms touch the ground lightly and follow the topography of the land, linked by glass enclosed hallways. Their simple shapes are strong silhouettes in an agricultural landscape, organized in a shifting grid akin to agricultural plots in the area. The slatted weathered hemlock cladding is a nod to the utilitarian barn structures that dot the local landscape. From the drive approach, the house gives little away, solid and almost bunker-like with entry flanked by a concrete wall and high clerestory. Entering through a glass “bridge” allows a glimpse of the pond beyond. Designed as a remote working studio for a photographer, the single room structures are divided by function—live, work, sleep. A detached pair of cubes houses a photography studio and darkroom. Living, dining and bedrooms comprise another cluster, centered around a shared outdoor space. There is a porosity to the interior world of this retreat. Glass hallways link the boxes and transform into open air bridges. Full-height picture windows and ventilation openings align for expansive views to the landscape. The result is privacy between the different programmatic elements in each cube, with a visual layering of space as the land is slowly revealed.

 

GLUCK+

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All images courtesy of GLUCK+


GLUCK+


CONTACT

423 West 127th Street
6th Floor
New York, NY 10027

Tel 212 690 4950
Fax 212 690 4961


VISIT

GLUCK+


Jackson Clements Burrows Architects | Hiding House

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Location: Elsternwick, Victoria, Australia

Gross Floor Area: 350 sqm

Year: 2014



Awards

2015  Victorian Architecture Awards – Residential (New) Commendation


Architects: Jackson Clements Burrows Architects

Photography: © John Gollings



This compact house is composed of a series of interlocking rooms and gardens that create spatial variety, while allowing the house to adapt to changing needs. Doors and windows slide open and closed, revealing views and protecting privacy on a site that was once a rear tennis court. Today it shares its boundary with 11 surrounding houses.

Living spaces are located on the ground floor with connecting vistas through to the garden and central courtyard. Bedrooms are located on the upper level of the house and have operable shutters to ensure privacy and control views and outlook to the surrounding landscape.

Off-white concrete bricks, concrete floors, white stained cladding and naturally oiled timber combine to create a generous home that provides maximum living comfort for its occupants, with minimal long term maintenance.

The dwelling is designed to be passively environmentally responsive, with orientation, cross flow ventilation, batten screens, exposed concrete slab and double brick walls all coming together to ensure substantial thermal mass and reduced energy use, while maximising occupant amenity.

Jackson Clements Burrows Architects


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All images courtesy of Jackson Clements Burrows Architects

 


Jackson Clements Burrows Architects


Established in 1998 by Tim Jackson, Jon Clements and Graham Burrows, JCB is a design-led architectural practice of over 50 design professionals united by a shared commitment to the delivery of innovative design solutions. more


CONTACT

One Harwood Place
Melbourne Vic 3000

T +61 3 9654 6227

info@jcba.com.au


VISIT

Jackson Clements Burrows Architects


 

Sawmill by Olson Kundig

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Location: Tehachapi, California, USA
Area: 4170.0 ft2
Year: 2014


 


Awards

2018 AIA National COTE Top Ten Award
2017 AIA National Housing Awards, Honor Award2017 AIA Northwest Pacific Region Citation Award
2017 Chicago Athenaeum, American Architecture Awards, American Architecture Award


Architects: Olson Kundig

Design Principal: Tom Kundig
Project Manager: Elizabeth Bianchi Conklin

Photography: Kevin Scott, Gabe Border



Set in the harsh high desert of California, Sawmill is a family retreat embedded into the tough, scrubby landscape. Sawmill harnesses the challenges and opportunities of its remote site, emphasizing sustainable strategies and reclaimed materials. Demonstrating that high design can also be high performance, Sawmill is a net-zero home that operates completely off the grid.

The client brief called for a self-sufficient home that maximized connection between architecture and nature, and between family members inside. Riffing on the tradition of tents around a campfire, the house is comprised of three wings connected by the central hearth in the living area. Here, a 12-by-26-foot window wall retracts with the turn of a wheel, transforming the outdoor patio into the fourth “tent” around the fire.

Tough as nails, Sawmill is made from durable materials that can withstand the harsh climate, where fires are a major hazard in summer and winters are extremely cold. The design approach was driven by a scavenger mentality, seeking always to do more with less, including using salvaged and recycled materials whenever possible.

Carefully sited to minimize disturbance to its remote environment, Sawmill acknowledges that while the desert is harsh, it is also fragile. Historically, the valley had been used for mining, ranching and logging – hence the name “Sawmill.” Recognizing this past exploitation of the site, the homeowners wanted their house to give back to the land, rather than take from it. Sawmill stands as a testament to high design as an environmental ethic – a building that connects people to place.

Olson Kundig

All images courtesy of Olson Kundig

 


Olson Kundig


Gambel Oaks Ranch by CCY Architects

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Location: Eagle County, Colorado, USA

Project Size: 5,897 SF Residence, 755 SF Garage, 40 Acres

Year: 2014



Awards

U.S. Green Building Council | LEED Gold

AIA Colorado | Award of Excellence

AIA Colorado West | Citation Award



Architecture and Interior Architecture: CCY Architects

Interior Finishes and Furnishings: Jill Soffer Design

Photography: © Art Gray Photography



Located on broad sweeping ranch lands overlooking a lake, Gambel Oaks Ranch was designed to blend into its surroundings and is not visible from any public roadways.

Following natural contours, a low-profile roof nestles the predominately one-story home into the scrub oak canopy.

Entrance to the site is choreographed to slowly reveal the residence in a series of glimpses through the trees, culminating in an arrival court that constrains panoramic views. From inside the home, views build from interior spaces to distant sights: pool terrace, pasture, far-off lake, mountain peaks.

In June 2015, the Gambel Oaks Ranch residence was awarded LEED for Homes Gold by the USGBC for its innovative use of horizontal loop field GSHP, PV, HWS, and radiant heating/cooling slab thermal control technologies.

Stone was used in layers reflective of the local geology: one color matched to the distant mountains, the other caged in gabion baskets from site rock excavated for building foundations.

Private areas within three distinct Corten boxes are organized as a family compound to contain the master suite, guest suite, and garage. Public gathering spaces defined by the Corten forms flow effortlessly outdoors for entertaining.

CCY Architects


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CCY Architects


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CONTACT

CCY Architects

228 Midland Avenue

Post Office Box 529

Basalt, Colorado 81621

T (970) 927-4925

ccyoffice@ccyarchitects.com


VISIT

CCY Architects


 

Fold House by Bossley Architects

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Location: Bay of Islands, New Zealand

Year: 2014



Awards

NZ Institute of Architects New Zealand Award 2016

NZ Institute of Architects Local Award 2015

NZ Institute of Architects Resene Colour Award 2015

Master Builders Auckland Region Gold Award 2014

Master Builders Outdoor Living Lifestyle Award 2014


Architects: Bossley Architects

Project Team: Pete Bossley, Peter Sisam

Photography: © Simon Devitt



This generous seaside house is the latest in a series of houses Bossleys have done based on the idea of “encampment”. The large footprint is divided into three separate buildings, creating an “open courtyard” which draws the space of the beach up the valley and into the overall composition of buildings.

The iconic elements of this project are the beautiful roofs, folded planes composed of triangular facets which float over the rooms below. The ceilings are light coloured poplar plywood, creating soft shifts of light and space hovering over the rooms below. The modulation of the roofs reflects the rolling hills of the landscape around the valley.

Bossley Architects


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All images courtesy of Bossley Architects

 


Bossley Architects


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Pete Bossley

Pete has an extensive reputation in architecture and interior design, with particular experience in galleries and museums, residential and retail. He was the joint principal responsible for design and documentation of the architecture of the national Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, whilst a Director at Jasmax, including interior design of all public and work spaces. He is involved as a concept designer in all projects in the practice, and his work has received numerous architectural awards.He has exhibited and lectured extensively on his work here and overseas, including Tokyo, Vancouver, Santiago, and Australia. He has also taught architectural design for over 25 years, and was Adjunct Professor of Architecture at Unitec Architecture and Landscape School.

Learn more about Bossley Architects


CONTACT

2/55 Mackelvie St, Ponsonby
Auckland, New Zealand

PO Box 47748, Ponsonby, Auckland 1144

  • Ph + 64 9 361 2201
  • Fax N/A

Email: mail@bossleyarchitects.co.nz


VISIT

Bossley Architects


 

 

Sawmill House by Archier Studio

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Location: Yackandandah, Victoria, Australia

Size: 100 m2

Year: 2014



Awards

National Architecture Award
Victorian Architecture Award
Houses Award


Architects: Archier Studio

Photography: © Ben Hosking



We focused our attention away from conventional solutions to investigate highly bespoke and cost effective alternatives. The Sawmill House demonstrates how Australia’s growing hoard of latent building materials can be used in new and innovative ways.

Located on the site of an old sawmill, which fell into remission in the late 90s, the Sawmill House is the result of a close connection between the client and the architect, brothers with a shared creative vision. The established relationship, and the client’s skill set, encouraged us to slowly develop the design over the course of construction, allowing for immediate feedback and bespoke solutions.

We worked closely with Chris’ brother Ben during the construction of the Sawmill House. His skill set – a builder and sculptural artist – interacted with our own, resulting in a move away from conventional design solutions towards more bespoke and cost effective alternatives.

Archier Studio


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All images courtesy of Archier Studio

 


Archier Studio


CONTACT

Melbourne —
Level 1, Studio 2
475 Sydney Rd
Brunswick, VIC 3056

Hobart —
7/65 Murray St
Hobart, TAS 7000


VISIT

Archier Studio


Truly Open Eichler House by Klopf Architecture

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Location: Palo Alto, California, US
Year: 2014



Architects: Klopf Architecture

Project Team: John Klopf, AIA, Geoff Campen, and Angela Todorova
Landscape Architect: Arterra Landscape Architects
Structural Engineer: Brian Dotson Consulting Engineers
Contractor: Flegels Construction
Photography ©2014 Mariko Reed



Klopf Architecture, Arterra Landscape Architects, and Flegels Construction updated a classic Eichler open, indoor-outdoor home. Expanding on the original walls of glass and connection to nature that is common in mid-century modern homes. The Truly Open Eichler is a remodeled single-family house in Palo Alto. This 1,712 square foot, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom is located in the heart of the Silicon Valley.

Klopf Architecture


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All images courtesy of Klopf Architecture | © Mariko Reed

 


Klopf Architecture


John Klopf is a licensed architect over 24 years in the field. He is the Founding Principal of Klopf Architecture, which he founded in 2001 after working for a few years at other firms. John, along with his wife and their two sons, lives in San Francisco and enjoys walking his dogs to work or biking to work whenever possible.
John was born in Cleveland Ohio, and is a graduate of both Harvard (Bachelor, 1993) and Berkeley (Master of Architecture, 2000). While at Berkeley, he won the highly competitive Branner travel fellowship for nine months of fully-paid independent architectural study in Japan, Europe, and Scandinavia. While at Harvard he studied abroad for one semester in Nanjing, China.
In addition to practicing architecture, John has taught design at USF (the University of San Francisco) as an adjunct professor, taught introductory design classes at Berkeley as a lecturer and graduate student instructor, and managed a major sustainability research project for the architecture department at Berkeley.
Today architectural practice consumes all of John’s professional time. He focuses on modernist homes, green and net-zero energy homes, and mid-century modern buildings. He is excited about the completion of Klopf Architecture’s first net-zero energy modern house and looks forward to working on more modern zero-net energy houses.

Team


CONTACT

Klopf Architecture,
A California Corporation
2180 Bryant Street, Suite 203
San Francisco, CA 94110

415.691.7227 | E-Mail


VISIT

Klopf Architecture


 

Paddington Courtyard House by Aileen Sage Architects

 

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Location: Paddington, Australia

Area: 200 sqm

Year: 2014


AWARDS
2015 Winner Dulux Colour Award – Single Residential Interior
2015 Shortlisted AIA NSW Chapter Awards – New House
2015 Shortlisted Houses Awards – New House over 200m2 and Outdoor


 


Architects: Aileen Sage Architects

Project Team: Amelia Holliday, Isabelle Toland, Sean Akahane-Bryen
Landscape Architect: Sue Barnsley Design
Heritage Architect: Urbis
Photography: © Tom Ferguson


 


The design of this new house is a reinterpretation of the terrace house typology that characterizes much of the Paddington Conservation Area.  Sandstone, bagged recycled brick, rendered and painted masonry, off form concrete and clear and patterned glass references both the original and surrounding built fabric. A series of courtyards are carved from the built envelope with a planted roof connecting the front and rear of the house. Each of the living areas opens up to the main central garden with different scaled openings allowing for flexibility in seasonal occupation.

Aileen Sage Architects


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Aileen Sage Architects


Isabelle Aileen Toland and Amelia Sage Holliday
Isabelle Aileen Toland and Amelia Sage Holliday.

Aileen Sage Architects was founded by Isabelle Aileen Toland and Amelia Sage Holliday.
Learn more


CONTACT

SUITE 4, LEVEL 2, 66 OXFORD STREET

DARLINGHURST NSW AUSTRALIA 2010

AMELIA + 61 407 263 542
ISABELLE + 61 414 711 254

STUDIO@AILEENSAGE.COM

AILEEN SAGE PTY LTD
ABN 49164730938
NOMINATED ARCHITECT NSW – AMELIA HOLLIDAY 8115


VISIT

Aileen Sage Architects


 

J House by Nabil Gholam Architects

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Location: Bois De Boulogne, Lebanon

Year: 2014



Architects: Nabil Gholam Architects



Structural Design: Serhal Consulting Office

Electro-mechanical Design: Pierre Dammous & Partners
Landscape Architecture: Vladimir Djurovic Landscape 


The house tells the story of psychological resilience and architectural defiance. A sort of Pandora box turned into a pearl inside a sea shell. It celebrates the triumph of life over death. A case in point for a resurrection.  Last but not least a brilliant story of thorough restoration and architectural acupuncture.

It all started with deciding how to go about this ‘difficult exorcism’: whether to work with what remained, as the owner wished to preserve some connection to his grandfather’s house despite its painful associations, or to start from scratch and wipe away both the connection and the unfortunate history.

In the end, the decision was taken to do both. The ruins were gutted then reinforced and reused as an historic shell into which a brand-new home could be inserted, the architectural emulation of the hermit crab, which makes its home in the abandoned shells of other mollusks.

Cleaning up the house and its surrounding garden took 4 months of intense work. This ruin’s new ‘resident’ is a series of spartan perforated Corten steel-clad boxes. Stacked on one another, they nestle in the embrace of the two remaining sections of the house but also project beyond it, both at the roofline where their aesthetically rusting outline is just visible above the parapets and at the south-eastern end of the house, where they project dramatically above a low-slung, 35-meter Corten steel-clad concrete and glass oblong with a planted roof.  The Corten steel skin changes color with time and is punctured with tiny dots echoing patterns of trees, a sort of “tree trunk ghost” projected on the façade.

The renovation added more than 2,000 square meters to the original 1,500 square meters stone house, along with an annex and guard house. Sustainable design was at the core of the renovation. In fact, the house uses solar energy for winter heating while harvesting rainwater and walls are backed with a double insulation layer. Among passive cooling strategies, the villa’s shading is designed to take advantage of natural light.
Partially sunk into the ground the volume houses a pool and an art gallery. Stretching through a grove of replanted pine trees, it is inserted in the sloping ground towards the snow-clad mountains in the distance.

Internally, the house’s layout is dictated in large part by the remains of the past, although where possible (and desirable), internal walls have been removed to create greater space. Narrow by contemporary standards, the main entrance opens directly onto a spacious living area flanked by several smaller rooms. The upper level is given over to the owners’ bedrooms. Again, by modern standards, most are relatively small but by exploiting the full height of the already high ceilings, which in some cases are now even higher thanks to the new additions, each bedroom has a mezzanine level and so functions more like a loft than a standard room.

The new core of the house stands in stark contrast to the classical arcades and stonework of the old home in which it sits but curiously (and despite its defiant modernity) it is somehow more at home, for in form if not appearance, it is a clear echo of the boxy, low-rise mountain homes of Lebanese tradition.

Sunk into the landscape through terracing, the house is designed to blend into its surroundings. Climbing plants and vines colonize the ruins – the process hastened by the introduction of recessed planters on the various terraces of the old home – to camouflage the past, cleansing the house of its troubled history.  More than a 1000 pine trees were planted in the garden: umbrella pines, oak trees, cork trees, Lebanese cedars and other indigenous trees upholster the landscape which also includes a rose garden. The scenery is henceforth a preserved fertile and blossoming land. The villa nowadays is almost unrecognizable from what it used to look like during the war.
The revival of walls, plants, and life inside finally took place in the house after long decades of gloomy events. The architectural intervention and the choice of materials are imbued with latent symbolism of war/revival comparing the house parts to living parts of an organism that constantly change with nature, light, and seasons.

The case of this house is as dreadful as it is beautiful. The story behind it and the testimonials backing it makes it stand as a powerful message. The House with two livesrestores faith in man’s will to fight and is with no doubt an example of an architectural work of high precision.

Nabil Gholam Architects


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All images courtesy of Nabil Gholam Architects | © Joe Kesrouani, Richard Saad



 


Nabil Gholam Architects


Nabil Gholam.jpgNabil Gholam studied Architecture at the UP-Paris Villemin, ex-Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris before moving to New York six years later to complete his studies in Urban Planning at Columbia University in the City of New York.

Moving from Manhattan to Barcelona, via southern China, where he briefly taught urban planning at the Yunnan Institute of Technology through the Kinney Fellowship, Nabil Gholam first began to practice architecture professionally at Ricardo Bofill’s Taller de Arquitectura, where as an Associate, he rose to handle the practice’s international projects.

In 1994, he set up his own office in Beirut. Later, in parallel with the firm’s growing reach, a European office was established to better direct its international ventures, first in Barcelona in 2006 before relocating to Seville in 2010.

Used to living in flux, Gholam has led a nomadic existence since the outbreak of civil war in Lebanon in 1975, his work and travels taking him on a circuit between Beirut and Paris, New York, Chicago, Yunnan, Barcelona, Istanbul and Seville and this constant criss-crossing of the globe has had a profound impact on his work.

Today, nabil gholam architects has grown into an international multidisciplinary team of architects, planners, designers and consultants with a portfolio spanning an extensive list of projects in architecture and urbanism. ngª has attracted attention, winning several competitions and major international awards.


CONTACT

Lebanon
jisr el-wati, street 90
building 110, 2nd floor
beirut 2066 8421
Lebanon

t: +961 1 423 513
f: +961 1 423 510

Spain
paseo de  las delicias 3, 3º Dcha
41001 sevilla
Spain

t:+34 95  421 33 56
f:+34 95  421 81 32

info@nabilgholam.com


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Nabil Gholam Architects


 

Buena Vista Residence by George Bradley | architecture + design

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Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Gross Floor Area: 280 m2
Year: 2014



Architects: George Bradley | architecture + design
Design team: George Bradley | architecture + design
Photography © Nic Lehoux, Sharon Risedorph


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All images courtesy of gb | architecture + design | © Nic Lehoux, Sharon Risedorph

 


George Bradley | architecture + design


Established in 2012, George Bradley | Architecture + Design provides approachable modern architectural design that celebrates the craft of building. Through close collaboration and an iterative design process, each project develops a unique architectural solution that addresses the client’s preferences while responding to specific site conditions and the overall context.


CONTACT

George Bradley | Architecture + Design

380 10th Street, #16

San Francisco, CA 94103

415.861.6567

George Bradley, AIA

gabradley@gbad.com


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George Bradley | Architecture + Design


 

HS Residence by Cubyc Architects

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Location: Bruges, Belgium

Area: 620 sqm

Year: 2014



Architects: Cubyc Architects

Photography: © Koen Van DammeBart Musschoot


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All images courtesy of Cubyc Architects| © Koen Van Damme, Bart Musschoot

 


Cubyc Architects


CONTACT

TER STRATEN 34
8200 BRUGGE

T +32 50 39 51 22
F +32 50 39 51 24

INFO@CUBYC.BE


VISIT

Cubyc Architects