Concrete cut / Pitsou Kedem Architects

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Program: single family house

Location: Ramat gan, Israel
Area: 500 sqm
Year: 2014


 


Architects: Pitsou Kedem Architects

Design team: Pitsou Kedem, Noa Groman
Architect in charge: Noa Groman
Lighting design: Orly Avron Alkabes
Styling for photography: Eti Buskila

Photography: © Amit Geron


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© Amit Geron

The creation of a line, this birth of the visual act, has been a meeting point throughout history of art, science and technology- from the dawn of writing to the abstractness of cave drawings and the penning of mathematical formulas – all of them make use of graphics to express a novel idea.

A line on a dark background- short or long, thin or thick – sometimes- expresses orientation or movement, at times convergence or divergence, pain and freedom, connection  or physical repulsion. It is one of the most fascinating of its properties – that the very border, which a line draws also permanently breaks worlds in two. A single lines simultaneously divides and connects separate worlds- each one onto himself.

Viewed from the front, The house looks like a monolithic operation of materials with a deep, monochromatic range of colors. Three rectangular prisms, lain upon one another, into a peaceful composition, stable and subdued, appearing as heavy masses.

A second, discerning  glance reveals a dramatic encounter of materials taken from two separate worlds  – poured, massive concrete and glass panels, creating a semitransparent wall with a decisive line running through it.

The variations of opaque glass yields a colossal appearance of yet more concreteness unifying the building’s construction- yet still natural. The glass acts to embrace the light – allowing it to pour in, controlling its every move. Thus a screen of  light is rendered in the most literal way- a receptive canvas of variation, deep and dynamic, adapting to those who pass through its rays of light.

Within the remaining glass of the structure- the line returns with the force of a quill- emphasizing the movements of the eastern facade, painting an exposed, clear slice withing the southern facade in which the utilization of transparent windows has been executed. Thus while the front facade is an abstract creation conceptually assuring the blending of identity and function, the rear facade graphically expresses three-dimensionality, the probing of depth and the feeling of brightness and freedom.

A glance at the side facades explains the process of exposure and  illumination beginning at the opaque facade facing the road and leading to the facades facing the yard and pool. A gradient of inter-changing levels of transparency between characteristically different facades made of the same foundation stones.

The entrance to the home occurs on the western side at the patio garden starting from the basement leading to the living rooms, accompanying visitors by degrees from the outer to the inner worlds.

The living rooms are  double in size and face the southern gardens visible from a library entrance on the same level as the private rooms. Two staircases lead to the living areas, one descending to the children’s area and another ascending to two additional levels- one containing the children’s living rooms and another with the parents rooms.

Two yards run along the children’s quarters, one is a patio ascending to the entrance and the other runs along the eastern side providing light, air, and an abundance of privacy. The function of the floor- corners for sitting, a private yard, and personal gym- attest to the private world of children.

The design of the space and their dispersal upon four planes creates in each one a sense of maximal privacy and although none is entirely exposed each of them comfortably access the exterior. Thus a structure of concrete and glass of various transparencies is created, the materials stray between one another as the visitor strays between the structure itself.

Pitsou Kedem Architects


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All images courtesy of Pitsou Kedem Architects

 


Pitsou Kedem Architects


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Pitsou kedem
AA (Architectural Association) Diploma RIBA Part 2
FOUNDER SINCE 2000

Read more here


CONTACT

Pitsou Kedem Architect
39 Maze St. Ground Floor Tel-Aviv
T. 03.6204493 F. 03.6292835

Studio: office@pitsou.com
Pitsou: pitsou@pitsou.com


VISIT

Pitsou Kedem Architects


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F House by Pitsou Kedem Architects

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F HOUSE

 


 


Location: Savyon, Israel

Area : 700.0 sqm

Year : 2016


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Architects:  Pitsou Kedem Architects

Design team: Pitsou Kedem, Hila Sela
In charge architect: Hila Sela
Project manager:Assaf Lupo ltd.
Lighting design: Orly Avron Alkabes
Styling for photography: Eti Buskila
Photography: © Amit Geron



Since the dawn of history, ‘public’ architecture – the architecture constructed by institutions of church and state, served as a tool in shaping the consciousness of the masses. Its massive dimensions, layout of spaces, and choice of materials, were all done with the objective of creating in the viewer and visitor a sense of moving between dimensions – from the day-to-day, the simple and the often inferior – to a place that is sublime, inspiring and of awesome majesty – homes to those among the people raised to privilege– the representatives of God on earth.

The Pharaohs in Ancient Egypt, influenced by the Nile which flows in linear manner, designed their temples as a voluminous physical experience. En route, temple visitors move over long stretches that become more convoluted and ever deeper, passing through spaces where each exposes a clue to the next, and where each transition appears to take you closer to the exalted and the shocking, which only the favored will get to see.

Western modern architecture sought to break free of its propaganda-based foundations and serve as a reflection of the values of a society, its culture, and its technological capabilities. It is intended to serve the public and the objectives of a nation’s government – no longer in the form of holy places, but as functional public buildings that are welcoming and democratic in nature. Accordingly, the importance of changing the mind-set of the visitor has been almost entirely absent from the design discourse in recent centuries.

When it comes to ‘grassroots architecture’ – namely, the architecture used in planning private residences – the experience of a change in consciousness upon entering a house is hardly ever thought of nowadays in the design process, having lost its importance quite some time ago. The living spaces and the living room are thus made as one piece, separated from the street by nothing more than a door, both physically and metaphorically.

The house under discussion here is about this experience. It is this dynamic that is generated in its design, explaining it to the visitor simply by placing him or her at its center from the first moment they stand in front of the facade facing the street — an opaque monolithic slab, covered in dark stone. The impermeability of the wall is softened by an avenue of young trees directing the visitor along the length of the paved footpath, directly into an inner courtyard surrounded by a semi-opaque stretch of wood, the first in a series of internal courtyards that form a key principle in the design of the house.

Walking along the path, as indeed the entry into the enclosed grounds, is part of the process of separating from the outside world and contemplating the present moment more deeply. Full attention can now be given to the structure, captured in its spaces like a prisoner – as we stand in front of a large, transparent curtain wall on which we can observe what is going on in the house in absolute transparency, something reserved for visitors invited because they appreciate such loveliness.

Although the facade facing the street is designed as an opaque mass and seems to hold an enigmatic secret, as soon as one crosses the line of the wooden ‘arbours’, the spaces of the house are suddenly visible in all their simplicity. The process of stepping into opaqueness and then catching sight of the private interior as it emerges from the sealed, the hidden, and the monolithic, into an open and light-filled space, would almost seem to confirm that you have entered the place now exposed – the private parts of the house. Here the geometry is simple and minimalist, and is clean and transparent in its form and materials, almost as if it were someone that had turned all his cards face up on the table.

The other internal courtyards, as well as the glass balustrade that encloses the swimming pool, separating it from the other outside spaces, seemingly bring together all the visitor’s experiences into a focused and penetrating experience, one that clearly spells out the boundaries of what is permitted and possible, and defines the house as a private and intimate experience.

Pitsou Kedem Architects


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All images courtesy of Pitsou Kedem Architects | © Amit Geron

Pitsou Kedem Architects


Pitsou Kedem Architects.jpg
Pitsou Kedem Architects

CONTACT

Pitsou Kedem Architect
39 Maze St. Ground Floor Tel-Aviv
T. 03.6204493 F. 03.6292835

Studio: office@pitsou.com
Pitsou: pitsou@pitsou.com
Press: pitsou.press@pitsou.com


VISIT

Pitsou Kedem Architects


Tel Aviv House by Pitsou Kedem Architects

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tel-aviv_house_024Location: TEL AVIV
Total floor area: 300 sqm
Plot size: 300 sqm
Design and built: 2012-2015
Program: single family house


Pitsou Kedem architects
Design team: Pitsou Kedem, Noa Groman
In charge architect: Noa Groman
Lighting design: Orly Avron Alkabes
Styling for photography: Eti Buskila
Photography: Amit Geron


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Visitors to the Old North of Tel Aviv would be surprised should they stumble upon a small neighborhood of low-lying family homes possessing just one or two storeys each. These are the remaining relics of Israel’s early urbanism when the English garden city motif populated many of her towns.

It incorporated a rural aesthetic of red-tiled roofs, low construction and spacious, generous gardens – some buildings were constructed by the Ministry of Housing and others were enthusiastically encouraged by it. Their first inhabitants were often new immigrants and many were soon purchased by elites who saw in them the promise of comfortable lives and peaceful surroundings within an ever-growing city.

In the march of time, some were abandoned, neglected, and then rediscovered and renewed. Dense cities developed rapidly and intensively around them causing a sharp desire for these oases of comfortable family homes. Some remained unaltered – modest homes through which waft the romantic scents of their history. Others have been adapted to reflect the modern tastes and desired proportions of their current owners.

Unique is the advent of contiguously built homes – built from the start as linked units with a continuous appearance. Siamese twins bound together by visual and constructive obligations. Their development requires consideration and adjustment. Their environment seeks to preserve their values – their culture and history.

At first glance the clean, bright facade of the —— home seems alien against the background of the neighborhood. Emphasizing its difference is the additional height of the home and its long, horizontal windows, hidden behind white iron lattice-work. These are in conversation, as it were, with the early international-style homes built in Tel Aviv, some of which displayed similar lattice-work that emulated freedom of form – rendered by indecipherable spatial division.

Viewing the home from the side reveals the preservation of the original slanted roof with its distinct romantic character. Now, however, the roof appears to be resting on the surrounding walls rendering its appearance so subtle it may even be missed. The end result of the side facade is an homage to the image of the “village home”.

A passage runs from the street straight through the entrance into the inner areas – exterior and interior – past and future – a home of modern proportions. The rear facade reveals a large, vitrine window unifying the home to the yard and pool. The passage through the storeys of inner rooms is formed by a floating bridge crossed by a staircase leading up to the roof.  There the bleached wood eaves stand out against the wall thinly coated with black cement, as if acquainting the architectural motifs of new and old, identity and exactitude that permeate the structure. Hence – inside and outside – two worlds – two cultural tales are intertwined within the existence of the structure, permitting its existence, breathing into it completely new life.

Pitsou Kedem Architects





 

pitsou2

Pitsou Kedem Architect

CONTACT

39 Maze St. Ground Floor Tel-Aviv
T. 03.6204493 F. 03.6292835

Studio: office@pitsou.com
Pitsou: pitsou@pitsou.com
Press: pitsou.press@pitsou.com


VISIT :

http://pitsou.com/studio/team-studio/

AB House by Pitsou Kedem Architects


Pitsou kedem

CONTACT

Pitsou Kedem Architect
39 Maze St. Ground Floor Tel-Aviv
T. 03.6204493 F. 03.6292835


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Location: Kfar Shmariau – Herzliya, Israel
Total floor area: 770 sqm
Total site area: 1800 sqm
Year: 2016


Architects: Pitsou Kedem Architects

Design team: Pitsou Kedem, Irene Goldberg, Raz Melamed

Photography: © Amit Geron



All images courtesy of Pitsou Kedem Architects



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Pitsou Kedem Architects


Factory Jaffa House by Pitsou Kedem Architects

JAFFA FACTORY HOUSE, 2013



Location : Tel Aviv, Israel

Architects : Pitsou kedem Architects


Design team :

pitsou2

Pitsou kedem
AA (Architectural Association) Diploma RIBA Part 2
FOUNDER SINCE 2000


irene2


Irene Goldberg

Mackintosh School of Architecture – Dip. RIBA part 2
SINCE 2004



raz2

Raz Melamed

B. Arch. Ariel university
SINCE 2007


CONTACT

Pitsou Kedem Architect
39 Maze St. Ground Floor Tel-Aviv
T. 03.6204493 F. 03.6292835

Studio: office@pitsou.com
Pitsou: pitsou@pitsou.com
Press: pitsou.press@pitsou.com


thumb2_ef167e81-c09a-40f3-a3a2-1db32171ac14-log1Photography : Amit Geron

            14 Lilinblum st. POB 29344

            ZIP: 61292
            Tel Aviv 
            Israel
 
                                      M: +972 54 2400499
                                      Mail: gerona@bezeqint.net
                                      Web: http://www.amitgeron.com

Jaffa Apartment

A historic residence in Old Jaffa

The 180 square meter residential home is located in Old Jaffa. Its location is unique in that it is set above the harbor, facing west with all of its openings facing the majestic splendor of the Mediterranean Sea. Whilst it is difficult to determine the buildings exact age, it is clear that it is hundreds of years old.

Over the years, it has undergone many changes and had many additions made that have damaged the original quality of the building and its spaces.


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The central idea was to restore the structure’s original, characteristics, the stone walls, the segmented ceilings and the arches including the exposure of the original materials (a combination of pottery and beach sand).The building has been cleaned of all of the extraneous elements, from newer wall coverings and has undergone a peeling process to expose its original state.

Surprisingly, modern, minimalistic construction styles remind us of and correspond with the ascetic style of the past, and this despite the vast time difference between them.

The central idea was to combine the old and the new whilst maintaining the qualities of each and to create new spaces that blend the styles together even intensify them because of the contrast and tension between the different periods.


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The historical is expressed by preserving the textures and materials of the buildings outer shell and by respecting the building engineering accord.

The modern is expressed by the opening of spaces and by altering the internal flow to one more open and free environment along with the use of stainless steel, iron and Korean in the various partitions, in the openings and in the furniture.

The project succeeds in both honoring and preserving the historical and almost romantic values of the structure whilst creating a contemporary project, modern and suited to its period. Despite the time differences, the tensions and the dichotomy between the periods exist in a surprisingly balanced and harmonic space.

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Source :

http://pitsou.com/