ISSA MEGARON | PROARH


Tipology: Single family house

Location: Vis, Croatia

Site area: 70135.0 m2

Area: 485.0 m2

Year: 2017



Architects: PROARH

Photography © Damir Fabijanić



The Issa Megaron project is dealing with questions regarding the context of the site boundary, envisioned on the plot that is read as a ‘’void ‘’, blank space-with deception that context is non -existent. Given that the “genius loci” is not only the plot an island of Vis but actually Mediterranean, we conceive the house by the system of the Socrates Megaron ( as the first passive house), reinterpreting the ancient traditional stone drywalls and creating a new rural man-made topography .
The assignment was to design a house for a temporary family retreat on a site without infrastructure, at the same time completely satisfying the needs of the user .
The complete lack of infrastructure and general inaccessibility imply that self-sustainability is prerogative, and the only solution for the completion of the project, that encompasses the plausibility of the project, minimal costs, satisfaction of all user needs, local government and urban plans as well as the architectural expression. The house is designed with natural cooling and ventilation systems, rainwater exploitation, solar panels, and other elaborate ways of exploiting natural resources, enabling the facility to function as a place for life.
The house is envisioned as a dug in volume, a residential pocket between the stretches of space forming walls, an artificial grotto, a memory of a primitive shelter. It consists of two levels – sleeping quarters/lounge on the first floor and downstairs open space dining/kitchen/lounge area, opened to the covered and uncovered terraces and pool deck. All the bearing elements are made of reinforced concrete. Stone from the site was used for the cladding of the facade.
The design that emerges from such conditions is subtle, creates a symbiosis with the new/old stonewall topography.
The newly built structure is man-made but unobtrusive in intent, material and ultimate appearance.

PROARH


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

ISSA-MEGARON-1
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-01
© Damir Fabijanić
DCIM100MEDIADJI_0111.JPG
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-4
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-8
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-5
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-9
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-7
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-20
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-9
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-21
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-10
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-27
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-11
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-28
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-12
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-34
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-18
© Damir Fabijanić
ISSA-MEGARON-22
© Damir Fabijanić

All images courtesy of PROARH | ©  Damir Fabijanić Continue reading “ISSA MEGARON | PROARH”

Advertisements

Miner Road by Faulkner Architects

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Location: Orinda, California, US

Year: 2016



Award

AIACC Residential Honor Award 2017

AIAEB Honor Award 2017



Photographer: Joe Fletcher


In the shade of Orinda’s native oaks, the home produces an in intimate relationship with the surrounding trees. Their texture is reflected architecturally in a hyper-minimal palette of unfinished white oak on the walls, ceilings, and floor; the rhythm of these interior boards offers a controlled representation of the tree growth outside. Basalt flooring, white gypsum walls, and Cor-Ten steel panels provide a material counterpoint to the textured wood; the steel skin refreshes every time it rains. Developed in close collaboration with the clients are a series of innovative sustainability features that bring the mechanical and electrical systems to net zero.

Faulkner Architects


Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-07
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-02
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-03
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-04
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-06
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-08
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-05
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-10
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-09
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-11
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-12
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-14
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-13
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-16
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-15
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-17
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-18
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-19
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-20
© Joe Fletcher
Miner Road_ FaulknerArchitects_Orinda-01
© Joe Fletcher

All images courtesy of  © Joe Fletcher Photography


Faulkner Architects


CONTACT
12242 Business Park Drive #18
Truckee, CA 96161
(530) 582-74002115 4th Street #A
Berkeley, CA 94710
(510) 704-8400

Villa V by Paul de Ruiter Architects

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Program: Luxury, energy-neutral villa

Location: Bloemendaal, The Netherlands
Total floor area: 489 m² (including a basement of 154 m²)

Parcel: 994 m²

Year: 2011


 


Architects: Paul de Ruiter Architects

Project team: Paul de Ruiter & Chris Collaris

Structural engineer: Quinten R. Wildeboer

Contractor: Scholz Groep

Interior architect: i29 interior architects (i.c.w. Paul de Ruiter Architects)

Landscape architect: Kamsteeg Tuinen

Photography: Tim van de Velde & Peter Lipton


In the middle of the protected dune area of Bloemendaal, in park Brederode, we designed an energy-neutral villa complete with all the luxury and comfort. Maintaining the surrounding landscape was our starting point for the design. With as many natural materials as possible we built the house on a dune slope.

Absorbed in the environment

We came up with a design that perfectly adapts to its location. The first floor rises above the ground and the sloping landscape. The north and south façades consist of large sliding glass windows and French oak, and the other two façades are constructed of preserved Waxedwood. A large skylight in the center of the house guides daylight into the heart of the home.

“We used recycled wood from an old ship to build the entrance and the garage. ”

Efficient energy management

We organized a technical area in the garage where we placed a thermal storage system and installed the heat pump. On the roof we created an alternating pattern of moss sedum plants and solar panels to provide energy.

A wooden interior

Together with interior designer i29 we created a fluid connection between the exterior and he interior. Large surfaces of veneered plywood, used for walls, cupboards, beds and even for the fire place, connect various rooms in the villa to each other.

Paul de Ruiter Architects


All images courtesy of Paul de Ruiter Architects


Paul de Ruiter Architects


medium_paul-thumbs

Paul de Ruiter is an architect, entrepreneur, innovator and inspirator known for his sustainable, game changing architecture. De Ruiter has been contributing to the national and international debate about sustainability, CO2-neutral design and building certification methods. He is a frequently asked lecturer internationally, writes articles for professional journals and teaches at the Dutch Technical Universities.

De Ruiter completed his studies at the Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) in 1990, where he started his doctoral dissertation “The Chameleon Skin” in 1992. In his PhD research he argues that buildings should produce rather than consume energy. Before founding his own Amsterdam-based office in 1994 he worked at leading architectural offices in Canada, Australia and the Netherlands.

Sustainable design is part of Paul de Ruiter’s DNA. His buildings are designed to allow the façades to respond intelligently to sunlight, enabling to maximize energy gain and storage. This is what gives his architecture its unique, recognizable and innovative appeal. Many of these climate façades are developed by himself, as his motto is ‘practice what you preach’. Moreover, De Ruiter believes architecture should not only generate energy in technical terms, but also in terms of the human factor. Values like happiness and inspiration combined with measurable factors such as daylight optimization to make intelligent, sustainable buildings.

Read more here


CONTACT


VISIT

Paul de Ruiter Architects


Ashburton Trail House by ZEN Architects

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Location: Ashburton, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Project size: 350 sqm
Site size: 892 m2



Architects: Zen Architects

Photography: Emma Cross


Built on gently sloping land in suburban Melbourne, this contemporary and environmentally friendly home is designed to integrate seamlessly with the inherent natural beauty of the existing site.

Our approach favoured the use of natural materials, both inside and out, in order to create a relationship between the house and its surrounding environment. A series of inter-connecting rooms allow clear lines of vision throughout the house while also maximising the available light.

The application of passive solar design principles provides an abundance of warmth in winter and captures cooling breezes during summer. This light filled, split level home features the intelligent and sensitive application of sustainable design principles, conveying a feeling of openness, expansiveness and calm.



Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Location : Austin, Texas, US

Year : 2012



Architects: Bercy Chen Studio LP

Design Team: Thomas Bercy, Calvin Chen, Dan Loe, Ryan Michael, Brad Purrington, Agustina Rodriguez

Photography: © Paul Bardagjy



Edgeland House is located on a rehabilitated brownfield site and is a modern re‐interpretation of one of the oldest housing typologies in North America, the Native American Pit House. The Pit House, typically sunken, takes advantage of the earth’s mass to maintain thermal comfort throughout the year. Like this timeless dwelling, the Edgeland House’s insulative green roof and 7‐foot excavation into the ground, keeps it cool in the summer and warm in the winter. The mechanical system combines: hydronic heating and a green roof for maximum energy efficiency.

Edgeland House is about healing the land and ameliorating the scars of the site’s industrial past. The project raises awareness about a diminishing natural landscape and its finite resources by creating a balance between the surrounding industrial zone and the natural river residing on the opposite side of the site.

Both visually and functionally, Edgeland House touches on architecture as site‐specific installation art and as an extension of the landscape. The program is broken up into two separate pavilions, living and sleeping quarters, and requires direct contact with the outside elements to pass from one to the other. This project sets new standards for sustainability while providing great aesthetic qualities through its small footprint and integrated mechanical features.

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center collaborated to reintroduce over 40 native species of plants and wildflowers to the Edgeland House green roof and site, serving to help protect the local ecosystem.

Bercy Chen Studio


Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio 03
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio 02
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio 01
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio 04
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio 05
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio 06
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio07
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio08
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio08
© Paul Bardagjy
Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio09
© Paul Bardagjy

All images courtesy of Bercy Chen Studio

 


PLANS


 


Bercy Chen Studio LP


Bercy Chen Studio LP is an architecture and urban planning firm with design/build capabilities based in Austin, Texas founded in 2001 by partners Thomas Bercy and Calvin Chen. Thomas is from Belgium and Calvin is from Taiwan by way of Australia; the partners’ European and Asian backgrounds form a design philosophy of unique perspectives. The work is influenced by vernacular precedents from various cultures- whether Islamic, Indian, African or pre-columbian, while maintaining respect for the particular contemporary contextual conditions. Due to this unique approach, the work has received national and international attention. Bercy Chen Studio won the prestigious “Emerging Voices” prize from the Architectural League of New York in 2006. Every year the League selects 7 of the most innovative designers from Europe and North America for this award. In the same year the firm was profiled in Architectural Record’s December 2006 “Design Vanguard” award issue, selected as one of top 10 emerging design firms in the world. Despite their international achievements, Calvin and Thomas remain active participants of the local community. Calvin serves on the City of Austin’s Design Commission and participated on several initiatives, including the “Create Austin” Cultural Masterplanning project. Both he and Thomas serve on the board of advisors for the Austin Museum of Art.

Bercy Chen Studio LP is committed to collaborating with clients in identifying design solutions and planning strategies to create innovative designs based on environmentally sustainable and financially viable business models in both the public and private sector. Having experience as a design/build operation, the firm’s first hand knowledge of construction & finance is crucial in ensuring successful project implementation. The firm is a member of the City of Austin’s Green Building Program and USGBC with certified 3 Star projects.

In 2012 the firm announced an expansion into Mexico, with David Potes at the helm of Bercy Chen Studio’s offices in Monterrey.


TEAM


VISIT

Bercy Chen Studio